The Value of the Person

Judy Bibbo

I spoke with Judy Bibbo, Vice President of Patient Services at McLeod Regional Medical Center, about her recent experience working along side the team in IV Therapy.  In addition to working with staff, Judy also focused on the patients.  In the IV Therapy Department, these patients often have multiple treatments in the department over a defined period of time.  Here is a note she sent to me about her observations.

Rob,

I was able to spend time in IV Therapy observing our staff and spending time with patients and families.  It was an extremely worthwhile experience for me as a leader.  We were able to hear directly from our cancer patients and families about some of the ideas that are important to them as they come to us for their treatment.

This information and perspective is helpful to me as we prepare to plan our new Cancer Center at McLeod. Spending time in each of the patient areas has provided me with better insight into the great relationship the staff have with their patients and their  commitment to Service Excellence standards. One of the patients told me that she normally has a family or church member accompany her  to treatments, but on that day, no one could come with her. It gave me the opportunity to take a little extra time to spend with her … to let her tell me about her journey. I was able to hear about her family and the things that are important to her.

I  was reminded how important it is for us to pause and  truly  listen to our patients about  aspects of their care that really matter to them.  As I moved from room to room in the IV Therapy Department, I watched staff and patients interact.  It was very obvious to me that the IV Therapy team  demonstrate compassion and caring with each of their patients and families.  Some of the patients made comments to me about how the staff are like an extended part of their family and they look to them for support.  One of the patients was a social worker.  She not only shared her experience with me, but explained that she had been in IV Therapy many times with a friend who was treated with chemotherapy.  Even though she lives in Clarendon County, she wanted to come to the McLeod IV Therapy Department for her treatments because she had seen the quality of care provided when her friend was here.  Another couple travelled from Kingstree, South Carolina, … and when I listened to the staff and patient, I  knew they  shared a very personal relationship . Wow, what a great group of staff!!!

Judy

One of our four core values is the Value of the Person.  It means that we will strive to treat people with the respect and dignity that we would want our loved ones to receive.  I can see and hear  this value in the report Judy provided about her working experience in IV Therapy.  In Service Excellence we teach that courtesy means:

–Make Eye contact with and acknowledge each person you pass in hallways, elevators and public areas.
–Immediately acknowledge people who enter your work area with eye contact, a smile, and a greeting.
–Allow patients and visitors to exit and enter doorways and elevators first, and hold doors open for them.
–Use a social title and the patient’s last name (Mr. Jones or Ms. Smith) unless the person expresses a wish to be called by another name.
–Use “Please” and “Thank you.”
–Personal calls or conversations should never take place in public areas where patients or visitors are present.
–At the conclusion of any customer interaction, always ask, “Is there anything else I can do for you?”
–Recognize your own body language — it can say a lot about your attitude of service.

Thanks Judy for spending time and helping at the ‘front line’ of patient care.  Thanks to our leaders in the department … Gwendolyn Lowery, Director of Outpatient Oncology, and Aquanetta Nesbitt, Patient Care Supervisor … and  thanks to the entire IV Therapy Department for demonstrating the Value of the Person through their friendliness and courtesy.  May we all make a conscious effort to model  these behaviors of courtesy in our daily lives.

Thanks,
Rob

Comments are closed.